brandon-turner_000Brandon M. Turner is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at The Ohio State University. He received a B.S. from Missouri State University in mathematics and psychology in 2008, a MAS from The Ohio State University in statistics in 2010, and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 2011. He then spent one year as a postdoctoral researcher at University of California, Irvine, and two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. His research interests include dynamic models of cognition and perceptual decision making, efficient methods for performing likelihood-free and likelihood-informed Bayesian inference, and unifying behavioral and neural explanations of cognition. His current focus is on understanding how external factors such as the environment, and internal factors such as working memory interact to shape an observer’s perception of the world, and ultimately how this perception drives their decisions.  Vita [@ 8/22/17]


PhotoOct2423616PMJames Palestro is a third-year doctoral student in the Psychology Department at The Ohio State University. He received a B.A. from Youngstown State University in psychology in 2015. His research interests include Bayesian statistical modeling, change detection, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Currently, he is focusing on identifying mechanisms used in perceptual decision making through neuroscientific measures.

 


photo_GiwonBahgGiwon Bahg is a second-year doctoral student. He received a B.A. in Psychology and Philosophy in 2013, and an M.A. in Psychology in 2015 from Seoul National University. He is interested in computational modeling, Bayesian methods, and temporal dynamics of human cognition, particularly in the context of thinking processes (e.g., categorization, reasoning, decision-making). His current work aims to implement adaptive design optimization for fMRI experiments using a joint modeling approach. He is also investigating dynamics of internal representations in decision-making, as well as its neural and computational bases.


IMG_6013Qingfang (Ashley) Liu is a second-year graduate student. She graduated from Beijing Normal University in China in 2016, with a B.S. in Psychology. Now she is studying for a doctoral degree in Cognitive Psychology and a MAS degree in Statistics. She is interested in perceptual and economical decision-making, computational cognitive models (e.g. sequential sampling models) and Bayesian methods. Her current focus is identifying neural correlates of intertemporal choice and constructing joint models by linking behavioral and neural data. She is also working as a course associate for Data Analysis in Psychology (Psych 2220).


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Fiona Molloy is a fourth-year undergraduate student majoring in Neuroscience at The Ohio State University. She is also minoring in Integrative Approaches to Health and Wellness and Substance Misuse and Addiction. Her research interests include computational modeling and the neural bases of cognitive control and decision-making. Additionally, she is interested in studying the dynamics of these processes in clinical populations, particularly in those struggling with addiction. She is currently working on modelling inhibitory control using neural and behavioral data.


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Matthew Galdo is a fourth-year undergraduate student majoring in Neuroscience and minoring in Statistics at The Ohio State University. His research interests include Bayesian statistics, decision-making, individual differences, cognitive dynamics, neurally-plausible cognitive models, and metacognition. He is also interested in applying cognitive models to better understand psychiatric phenomena. Currently, his main focus is developing a general framework for using structural brain data to inform joint models of neural and behavioral data.


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Peter Hsu is a third-year undergraduate student studying Neuroscience with minors in Computer and Information Science and Cognitive Science. His research interests include computational modeling and brain-machine interface. His current work involves programming experiments in SMILE (State Machine Interface Library for Experiments) to assess the adaptive representation of stimuli in a changing environment.


coreyCorey Keyser is a third-year undergraduate student double majoring in Neuroscience and Philosophy with a minor in Computer and Information Science. He is interested in computational modeling with a focus on integrating our understanding of biological processes into our cognitive explanations of processes like decision, desire, and self-control. Currently, his research involves using dynamic sampling to improve cognitive models of evidence accumulation.